Thursday, February 04, 2010

Simplicity

I love the simplicity of Ashtanga yoga.
The asanas are rather demanding, but everything else is purity in Ashtanga.
I know that music helps me to practice, it gives me energy. But music is not part of Ashtanga yoga. It is intended to listen to the breath (uddjay breathing).
The eyes are open and gaze at a point (dristhi). This is also such a clear and simple order. The eyes shall not move. This calms the mind. Usually rapid eye movement happens when the mind is thinking. When gazing at a point and not moving the eyes the mind becomes calm, it functions the other way round as well.
As I know the sequence of the asanas I do not have to look what others do or what the teacher is doing. I admit to have these routines give a certain security/independance. Routines facilitate life. I can focus on myself when I know what comes next.

I am sure that other yoga styles can teach me a lot as well. They are also fun. But I have found my style: It is Ashtanga yoga. It is because it has so much dynamic, but also because it has this simplicity.

Picture: Munich at night.

3 comments:

Debb said...

What you say about no music, listening to the breath, now makes total sense to me. I now understand why my Ashtanga teacher only plays music when we do savasana while she goes around the room and gives a short foot massage for each student :)

Debb said...

What you say about no music, listening to the breath, now makes total sense to me. I now understand why my Ashtanga teacher only plays music when we do savasana while she goes around the room and gives a short foot massage for each student :)

Ursula said...

It is that listening to the breath and using the bandhas directs inwardly. Practicing with open eyes directs the outwardly. There are these both directions (inward and outward).
Music and listening to a teacher which asanas has to be done next is too much distraction for my taste.